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Nanomedicine

By

Jennifer Le

, PharmD, MAS, BCPS-ID, FIDSA, FCCP, FCSHP, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego

Last full review/revision Jun 2022| Content last modified Jun 2022
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION

Nanomedicine uses nanotechnology (tiny particles called nanoparticles, and machines called nanorobots) to improve drug delivery to specifically targeted organs. Targeting specific organs allows doctors to achieve the best possible effectiveness and safety of the drugs they administer. The size of the nanoparticle, which usually ranges from 1 to 100 nm (nano- means "billionth part of"), as well as its shape and surface chemistry all affect what the body does to a drug, including

Most nanomedicines are administered orally or intravenously and achieve their effects through accumulation throughout certain tissues, including tumors.

Nanoparticles are designed to stay in targeted organs for long periods of time and cause the fewest side effects.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION
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