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Polypeptide Antibiotics: Bacitracin, Colistin, Polymyxin B

By

Brian J. Werth

, PharmD, University of Washington School of Pharmacy

Last full review/revision May 2020
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Topic Resources

Bacitracin is a polypeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall synthesis and is active against gram-positive bacteria.

Colistin (polymyxin E) and polymyxin B are cationic polypeptide antibiotics that disrupt the outer bacterial cell membrane by binding to the anionic outer membrane and thereby neutralizing the bacteria’s toxicity and causing bacterial cell death.

Colistin methane sulfonate (colistimethate sodium [CMS]) is a parenteral preparation of a prodrug that is transformed in blood and urine to colistin. CMS is less toxic than colistin.

Polypeptides other than colistin are usually used topically; systemic absorption is negligible.

Resistance

Resistance is typically acquired via modifications to the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane; these modifications lead to a more positively charged cell surface, which lacks affinity for the positively charged polymyxins. Acquired resistance can be carried on mobile genetic elements (eg, mcr-1, 2, 3 [plasmid-mediated colistin resistance] plasmid), increasing the risk of horizontal transfer. Cross-resistance between colistin and polymyxin B is nearly 100%.

Indications for Polypeptide Antibiotics

Bacitracin is used mainly as a topical treatment for

These drugs are not active against Proteus, Providencia, Burkholderia, and Serratia species and some obligate anaerobes, including Bacteroides fragilis and gram-positive bacteria (1 Indications reference Polypeptide antibiotics disrupt bacterial cell walls. Bacitracin is a polypeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall synthesis and is active against gram-positive bacteria. Colistin (polymyxin... read more ).

The increasing prevalence of extensively drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli in hospitals has led to a resurgence of the use of IV colistin for serious systemic infections (eg, ventilator-associated pneumonia Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) develops at least 48 hours after hospital admission. The most common pathogens are gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus aureus; antibiotic-resistant organisms... read more , bacteremia Bacteremia Bacteremia is the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream. It can occur spontaneously, during certain tissue infections, with use of indwelling genitourinary or IV catheters, or after dental... read more ). However, IV polymyxin B and colistin should typically be used only when there are no less toxic options. When polymyxins are used, they should be used in combination with other drugs such as meropenem, not as monotherapy. Colistin is often combined with other antibiotics to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria; effectiveness of these combinations has not yet been rigorously assessed in clinical trials. Some of the newer combination beta-lactam plus inhibitor drugs are preferable to polymyxin-based therapy whenever possible.

Table
icon

Indications reference

Contraindications to Polypeptide Antibiotics

All polypeptides are contraindicated in patients who have had an allergic reaction to them.

Whenever possible, CMS and polymyxin B should not be given simultaneously with drugs that block neuromuscular transmission (eg, rocuronium) or are nephrotoxic (eg, aminoglycosides Aminoglycosides Aminoglycosides (see table Aminoglycosides) have concentration-dependent bactericidal activity. These antibiotics bind to the 30S ribosome, thereby inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Spectinomycin... read more ).

Use During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Bacitracin may pose minimal risk during pregnancy and breastfeeding because systemic absorption is minimal; however, safety has not been established.

Polymyxin B has not been adequately evaluated in animal reproduction studies. No well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Safety of polymyxin B in pregnant women has not been determined.

Colistin methane sulfonate (CMS) showed some risk in animal reproduction studies. Data related to pregnancy in humans are inadequate. Whether it is safe to use colistin or CMS during breastfeeding is unknown.

Adverse Effects of Polypeptide Antibiotics

Adverse effects of polypeptides include

  • Nephrotoxicity

  • Central and peripheral neurotoxicity

Polymyxins are nephrotoxic. CMS and polymyxin B may cause circumoral and extremity paresthesias, vertigo, slurred speech, and muscle weakness and respiratory difficulty due to neuromuscular blockade, especially in patients with renal insufficiency.

Dosing Considerations for Polypeptide Antibiotics

Because colistin was released before the advent of modern pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis, appropriate dosing has not been studied as rigorously as for many modern antibiotics. In addition, manufacturers do not use a uniform method of describing drug amount; some use international units, and others use milligrams of colistin base activity or milligrams of actual colistimethate.

Whatever units are used, many experts believe that the manufacturer-recommended dose of 2.5 to 5 mg/kg of colistin base activity per day divided into 2 to 4 doses is too low and recommend higher dosing regimens, including the use of a loading dose (1 Dosing considerations reference Polypeptide antibiotics disrupt bacterial cell walls. Bacitracin is a polypeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall synthesis and is active against gram-positive bacteria. Colistin (polymyxin... read more ). However, nephrotoxicity is dose-dependent and becomes a greater concern with higher doses. Dosing should be discussed with an expert.

Dosing considerations reference

Drugs Mentioned In This Article

Drug Name Select Trade
No US brand name
CLEOCIN
CUBICIN
FLAGYL
MONUROL
ZYVOX
VIBATIV
DALVANCE
SIVEXTRO
ORBACTIV
BACTROBAN
AZACTAM
VANCOCIN
TINDAMAX
FORTAZ, TAZICEF
ZITHROMAX
BIAXIN
ERY-TAB, ERYTHROCIN
DIFICID
No US brand name
No US brand name
GENOPTIC
ANCEF, KEFZOL
FURADANTIN, MACROBID, MACRODANTIN
KEFLEX
THAM
No US brand name
CEFOTAN
MEFOXIN
No US brand name
CEFTIN, ZINACEF
No US brand name
No US brand name
SUPRAX
CLAFORAN
No US brand name
No US brand name
No US brand name
MAXIPIME
No US brand name
BACIIM
TYGACIL
ACHROMYCIN V
MINOCIN
BICILLIN L-A
No US brand name
PRIMSOL
MYCOBUTIN
VIBRAMYCIN
XERAVA
RIFADIN, RIMACTANE
No US brand name
PRIFTIN
XIFAXAN
DORIBAX
INVANZ
MERREM
AMOXIL
SULFAMYLON
No US brand name
BLEPH-10
No US brand name
NALLPEN IN PLASTIC CONTAINER
BACTOCILL IN PLASTIC CONTAINER
AZULFIDINE
BACTRIM, SEPTRA
DARAPRIM
SILVADENE
QUALAQUIN
CILOXAN, CIPRO
No US brand name
ZEMDRI
No US brand name
TOBI, TOBREX
No US brand name
NUZYRA
No US brand name
COLY-MYCIN M
ARALEN
PROGRAF
TIKOSYN
SEROQUEL
LANOXIN
OZURDEX
DILANTIN
LANIAZID
No US brand name
NARDIL
MARPLAN
DEMEROL
WELLBUTRIN, ZYBAN
No US brand name
SYNERCID
PROZAC, SARAFEM
ELIXOPHYLLIN
ANTABUSE
COUMADIN
ACZONE
No US brand name
No US brand name
OCUFLOX
AFRINOL, SUDAFED
ADRENALIN
LEVOPHED
BAXDELA
FACTIVE
LEVAQUIN
AVELOX
No US brand name
No US brand name
ZYMAR
No US brand name
ORAP
ZOSYN
CORTEF, SOLU-CORTEF
No US brand name
No US brand name
ALTOPREV
ZOCOR
PROVAYBLUE
No US brand name
HALCION
NEORAL, SANDIMMUNE
OTREXUP
ANECTINE, QUELICIN
MEPRON
DIFLUCAN
HALDOL
SPORANOX
NIZORAL
RESCRIPTOR
VIRAMUNE
BLOXIVERZ
No US brand name
VFEND
RETROVIR
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