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Bundle Branch Block

By

L. Brent Mitchell

, MD, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary

Last full review/revision Feb 2021| Content last modified Feb 2021
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Bundle branch block is a type of conduction block involving partial or complete interruption of the flow of electrical impulses through the right or left bundle branches.

The electrical current that controls the contraction of heart muscle starts in the sinoatrial node, flows through the heart's upper chambers (atria) and then goes to the heart's lower chambers (ventricles) through a sort of electrical junction box called the atrioventricular node (AV node). The AV node is located in the lower part of the wall between the atria near the ventricles and provides the only electrical connection between the atria and ventricles. The bundle of His is a group of fibers that conducts electrical impulses from the atrioventricular node to the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles). The bundle of His divides into two bundle branches. The left bundle branch conducts impulses to the left ventricle, and the right bundle branch conducts impulses to the right ventricle. Conduction may be blocked in the left or right bundle branch.

The left bundle branch further divides into two branches, called the anterior and posterior fascicles. If conduction is blocked through one of these fascicles, the blockage is called a hemiblock or a fascicular block.

Tracing the Heart’s Electrical Pathway

The sinoatrial (sinus) node (1) initiates an electrical impulse that flows through the right and left atria (2), making them contract. When the electrical impulse reaches the atrioventricular node (3), it is delayed slightly. The impulse then travels down the bundle of His (4), which divides into the right bundle branch for the right ventricle (5) and the left bundle branch for the left ventricle (5). The impulse then spreads through the ventricles, making them contract.

Bundle branch block usually causes no symptoms. Right bundle branch block is not serious in itself and may occur in apparently healthy people. However, it may also indicate significant heart damage due to, for example, a previous heart attack Acute Coronary Syndromes (Heart Attack; Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina) Acute coronary syndromes result from a sudden blockage in a coronary artery. This blockage causes unstable angina or heart attack (myocardial infarction), depending on the location and amount... read more Acute Coronary Syndromes (Heart Attack; Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina) .

Usually, no treatment is needed.

More Information

The following is an English-language resource that may be useful. Please note that THE MANUAL is not responsible for the content of this resource.

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