Merck Manual

Please confirm that you are not located inside the Russian Federation

honeypot link

Aortitis

By

Mark A. Farber

, MD, FACS, University of North Carolina;


Federico E. Parodi

, MD, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Reviewed/Revised Jul 2023 | Modified Dec 2023
VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION

Aortitis is inflammation of the aorta.

The aorta is the largest artery of the body. It receives oxygen-rich blood from the heart and distributes it to the body through smaller arteries that branch off of it.

Aortitis is caused by

Inflammation usually involves all layers of the aorta and may lead to blockage of the aorta or its branches or weakening of the arterial wall, resulting in aneurysms.

Blood tests that show increased levels of inflammation in the body (elevated C-reactive protein level, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate) can support a diagnosis of aortitis.

Treatment differs depending on the cause of the inflammation, for example, antibiotics are given if infection is the cause or anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive medications are given if a systemic rheumatic disease is the cause (for example, giant cell arteritis Giant Cell Arteritis Giant cell arteritis is chronic inflammation of large and medium arteries of the head, neck, and upper body. Typically affected are the temporal arteries, which run through the temples and provide... read more ).

If the aortitis has caused irreversible damage, open surgery to put in a bypass graft or placement of a stent graft through an artery may be necessary.

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION
VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION
quiz link

Test your knowledge

Take a Quiz!
iOS ANDROID
iOS ANDROID
iOS ANDROID
TOP