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Childhood Vaccination Schedule

By

The Manual's Editorial Staff

Last full review/revision Jul 2021| Content last modified Jul 2021
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What is the recommended childhood vaccine schedule?

  • It's a schedule created by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also known as the CDC

  • It shows which vaccines children need, the ages they can get them, and the number of shots they'll get

  • It’s designed to give children vaccines when they first have a chance of getting certain infections

Can children get vaccines if they’re sick?

Children can still get vaccines if they have a slight fever from a mild infection, like an ordinary cold. Your child’s doctor will help make that decision.

Can I delay or skip giving my child certain vaccines?

Your child is more likely to get certain infections if you don't follow the recommended schedule. However, a slight delay usually won’t harm your child or make your child have to start over with the shots. If you have concerns about the recommended schedule, talk to your child’s doctor.

Routine Vaccinations for Infants, Children, and Adolescents

Following the recommended vaccination schedule is important because it helps protect infants, children, and adolescents against infections that can be prevented. The schedule below is based on the ones recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; see also the CDC schedule for infants and children and the CDC schedule for older children and adolescents). The schedule below indicates which vaccines are needed, at what age, and how many doses (indicated by the numbers in the symbols).

There is a range of acceptable ages for many vaccines. A child's doctor can provide specific recommendations, which may vary depending on the child's known health conditions and other circumstances. Often, combination vaccines are used so that children receive fewer injections. If children have not been vaccinated according to the schedule, catch-up vaccinations are recommended, and parents should contact a doctor or health department clinic to find out how to catch up. Parents should report any side effects after vaccinations to their child's doctor.

For more information about this schedule and other vaccination schedules, parents should talk to a doctor or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vaccines & Immunizations web site.

Routine Vaccinations for Infants, Children, and Adolescents

[a] Hepatitis B vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccine The hepatitis B vaccine helps protect against hepatitis B and its complications (chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer). Generally, hepatitis B is more serious than hepatitis A and... read more : This vaccine is given to most newborns before they are discharged from the hospital. The first dose is typically given at birth, the second dose at age 1 to 2 months, and the third dose at age 6 to 18 months. Infants who did not receive a dose at birth should begin the series as soon as possible.

[b] Rotavirus vaccine Rotavirus Vaccine The rotavirus vaccine is a live-virus vaccine that helps protect against gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus, which causes vomiting, diarrhea, and, if symptoms persist, dehydration and organ... read more : Depending on the vaccine used, two or three doses of the vaccine are required. With one vaccine, the first dose is given at age 2 months and the second dose at age 4 months. With the other vaccine, the first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, and the third dose at age 6 months.

[c] Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccine The Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine helps protect against bacterial infections due to Hib, such as pneumonia and meningitis. These infections may be serious in children. Use of the... read more : Depending on the vaccine used, three or four doses of the Hib vaccine are required. With one vaccine, the first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, and the third dose at age 12 to 15 months. With the other vaccine, the first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, the third dose at age 6 months, and the fourth dose at age 12 to 15 months.

[d] Poliovirus vaccine Polio Vaccine The polio vaccine protects against polio, a very contagious viral infection that affects the spinal cord and brain. Polio can cause permanent muscle weakness, paralysis, and sometimes death... read more : Four doses of the vaccine are given. The first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, the third dose at age 6 to 18 months, and the fourth dose at age 4 to 6 years.

[e] Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine The diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine is a combination vaccine that protects against these three diseases: Diphtheria usually causes inflammation of the throat and mucous membranes... read more : Before age 7, children are given the DTaP preparation. Five doses of DTaP are given. The first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, the third dose at age 6 months, the fourth dose at age 15 to 18 months, and the fifth dose at age 4 to 6 years.

DTaP is followed by one lifetime dose of a tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) Administration The tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccine protects against toxins produced by the tetanus and diphtheria bacteria, not against the bacteria themselves. There is also a combination vaccine that adds... read more booster given at age 11 to 12 years (shown as the number 6 on the above schedule). This dose is followed by a tetanus-diphtheria booster every 10 years.

[f] Pneumococcal vaccine Pneumococcal Vaccine Pneumococcal vaccines help protect against bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci). Pneumococcal infections include ear infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, bloodstream... read more : Four doses of the vaccine are given. The first dose is given at age 2 months, the second dose at age 4 months, the third dose at age 6 months, and the fourth dose at age 12 to 15 months.

[h] Influenza (flu) vaccine Influenza Vaccine The influenza virus vaccine helps protect against influenza. Two types of influenza virus, type A and type B, regularly cause seasonal epidemics of influenza in the United States. There are... read more : The influenza vaccine should be given yearly to all children, beginning at age 6 months. There are two types of vaccine available. One or two doses are needed, depending on age and other factors. Most children need only one dose. Children who are 6 months to 8 years old who have received fewer than two doses or whose influenza vaccination history is unknown should receive two doses at least 4 weeks apart .

[k] Hepatitis A vaccine Hepatitis A Vaccine The hepatitis A vaccine helps protect against hepatitis A. Typically, hepatitis A is less serious than hepatitis B. Hepatitis A often causes no symptoms, although it can cause fever, nausea... read more : Two doses of the vaccine are needed for lasting protection. The first dose is given between ages 12 to 23 months, and the second dose 6 to 18 months later. If children over age 24 months have not been vaccinated, they can still be given the hepatitis A vaccine if desired.

[l] Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps protect against infection by the strains of HPV that are most likely to cause the following: Cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer in... read more : Routine vaccination is recommended at age 11 to 12 years (can start at age 9 years) and for previously unvaccinated or not adequately vaccinated people up through age 26 years (not shown on the above schedule). The human papillomavirus vaccine is given to girls and boys in 2 or 3 doses. The number of doses depends on how old the child is when the first dose is given. Those given the first dose at age 9 to 14 years are given 2 doses, separated by at least 5 months. Those given the first dose at age 15 years or older are given 3 doses. The second dose is given at least 1 month after the first, and the third dose is given at least 5 months after the first dose.

Where can I find more information about vaccines for children?

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version
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