Merck Manual

Please confirm that you are a health care professional

honeypot link

Etiology of Anemia

By

Evan M. Braunstein

, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Last full review/revision Sep 2020| Content last modified Sep 2020
Click here for Patient Education
Topic Resources
Table
icon

Blood loss can be acute or chronic. Anemia does not develop until several hours after acute blood loss, when interstitial fluid diffuses into the intravascular space and dilutes the remaining RBC mass. During the first few hours, however, levels of polymorphonuclear granulocytes, platelets, and, in severe hemorrhage, immature white blood cells and normoblasts may rise. Chronic blood loss results in anemia if loss is more rapid than can be replaced or, more commonly, if accelerated erythropoiesis depletes body iron stores (see Iron Deficiency Anemia Iron Deficiency Anemia Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and usually results from blood loss; malabsorption, such as with celiac disease, is a much less common cause. Symptoms are usually nonspecific... read more Iron Deficiency Anemia ).

Deficient erythropoiesis has myriad causes. Complete cessation of erythropoiesis results in a decline in RBCs of about 7 to 10%/week (1%/day). Impaired erythropoiesis, even if not sufficient to decrease the numbers of RBCs, often causes abnormal RBC size and shape.

Excessive hemolysis can be caused by intrinsic abnormalities of RBCs or by extrinsic factors, such as the presence of antibodies or complement on their surface, that lead to their early destruction. An enlarged spleen Splenomegaly Splenomegaly is abnormal enlargement of the spleen. (See also Overview of the Spleen.) Splenomegaly is almost always secondary to other disorders. Causes of splenomegaly are myriad, as are the... read more sequesters and destroys RBCs more rapidly than normal. Some causes of hemolysis deform as well as destroy RBCs. Hemolysis normally causes increased reticulocyte production unless iron or other essential nutrients are depleted or there is erythropoietin deficiency.

Drugs Mentioned In This Article

Drug Name Select Trade
No US brand name
VIRAZOLE
Click here for Patient Education
NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Click here for the Consumer Version

OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER

Professionals also read

Test your knowledge

Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis
A 10-year-old girl is brought to the clinic by her father because she has had pain in her right upper leg for the past 3 months. On physical examination, the patient is unable to bear weight on the limb. Edema of the upper leg and tenderness to palpation are noted. X-rays show 2 bone lesions with sharp margins and a punched-out appearance. Which of the following is the most appropriate definitive step in diagnosis?
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID

Also of Interest

Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
Download the Manuals App iOS ANDROID
TOP